A year of sewing (and knitting!)

Well. There’s been a lot going on in life recently, not least trying to buy our first home… so blogging my makes fell somewhat by the wayside. I found posting on Instagram much easier but even that I’ve had off-periods of.

The last couple of weeks though I have been inspired by a few new-to-me blogs and vlogs (see my updated link list over in the sidebar), so I thought I’d post a round-up of what I’ve been up to, and try to get back into blogging again…

I didn’t quite realise almost a year had passed since my last post!

So here’s a quick-fire summary of what I’ve made in the last year.

Tops – [Clockwise from TL] Threadcount 1502 wrap top, fabric from stash (Knitting & Stitching show March 2016) / Sew Over It Clara blouse, fabric from stash (KSS Oct 2017) / GBSB cami top, fabric from stash (Sew Hayley Jane April 2017) / Tilly & the Buttons Agnes, fabric from stash (KSS March 2016) / another SOI Clara, fabric from stash (KSS March 2017)

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Trousers – the only pattern I’ve been brave enough to try so far (Ginger jeans TBC!!) – Sew Over It Ultimate trousers, x 3 in houndstooth from KSS March 2017, swallow print from SHJ May 2017 and floral from SHJ August 2017.

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Dresses – [Clockwise from TL] SOI cowl-neck dress, fabric from stash (KSS Oct 2017) / SOI Phoebe dress, 2 fabrics from stash (bodice KSS Oct 2017 & skirt Minerva crafts, Dec 2016) / SOI Penny dress, fabric from stash (SHJ June 2017) / SOI Penny/1940s tea dress hack, fabric from stash (SHJ November 2017)

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What I’ve made this month – [Clockwise from TL] Bias binding, chambray fabric from stash / Grainline Scout tees x 3, bird print KSS Oct 2017, black viscose SHJ Feb 2017 with bias trim from deep stash, anchor-print cotton SHJ June 2017 / Self-drafted music tote, fabric from stash (Birmingham rag market Aug 2016) / triangle scarf, fabric from stash (KSS March 2015) / Sew Me Something “Throw it all in” bag, fabric from stash (KSS March 2016).

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And finally…knitting! – My knitting has become way more proficient in the last year and especially since finishing my Victory sweater, I’ve had the confidence to tackle a ton more projects.

[Picture 1, Clockwise from TL] Curious Handmade Talisman Shawl, yarn TravelKnitter Tanami 4ply camel silk in Midnight Fireflies / Curious Handmade Winter Rose socks, yarn The Knitting Goddess 4ply sock in Charcoal / Self-designed ‘pixellated’ cowl, yarn Wool and the Gang Feeling Good in Rocky Grey & Forest Green / Curious Handmade Magnolia socks, yarn CoopKnits Socks Yeah! in Obsidian / Curious Handmade Fireflies Rising shawlette, yarn Manos Del Uruguay Silk Blend in Baltic & Danube

[Picture 2, Clockwise from TL] Wool and the Gang Lil’ Snood Dog cowl, yarn WATG Crazy Sexy Wool in Mustard Sally / original 1940s pattern Victory sweater, yarn Cascade 220 Fingering in Ginseng, In the Navy, Puget Sound & Azure / Graffiti on the Metro fingerless gloves, yarn Trailing Clouds Nimbus self-striping sock in Mind The Gap / WATG Get Up headband (actually made 2 of these), yarn WATG Feeling Good in Rocky Grey & Forest Green.

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Links:

Sew Over ItSew Hayley JaneKnitting & Stitching ShowCurious HandmadeWool and the GangTravelKnitterThe Knitting GoddessCoopKnitsTrailing CloudsSew Me Something

Sew it’s summer…

Another four months have passed since I last blogged, so what have I been up to in that time?

  • I cast on a new knitting project, the Victory sweater, an actual vintage pattern from the 1940s. About to complete the front piece and then take a break for the Yarn in the City GLYC anniversary KAL (more on that later, I promise!)
  • I made another SOI 1940s tea dress, which turned out much looser fit than the first one, even though I cut the same size…mystery yet to be solved for version 3.
  • I have got a beautiful Sew Hayley Jane box every month and love being part of this club, I highly recommend them to any sewist. I’m going to try and do a review/round up post soon on that.
  • Got into fat quarter sewing, because of the SHJ boxes – I’ve made an origami bag, three headbands, an earbud pouch and have plans for some cushion covers.
  • Made a SOI kimono jacket and French seamed the whole thing.
  • Took the Closet Case Files “Sew your dream swimsuit” online course and made not one but TWO awesome swimsuits (Sophie and Bomshell) to take on holiday to Croatia next week.
  • Made a set of Carolyn Pyjamas (also CCF) in beautiful soft cottony viscose.

summer round up

And what’s next?

  • GLYC Anniversary KAL knitting project
  • SOI 1940s tea dress mark III
  • SOI Penny shirt dress
  • SOI Ultimate trousers – trying to refine fit issues with their online fitting workshop
  • Trying to use up remnants creatively with some mix-and-match projects or little cami tops
  • Finally do something with my “to refashion” pile that’s been sitting waiting for most of a year and keeps getting added to…

Quick February Roundup – Three more garments in the bag!

I may have been lacking in blogging since the first Toaster Sweater this year but the sewing has been keeping momentum.

Firstly I managed a second garment in January, a Sew Over It Betty dress in a blue floral cotton. I’d bought that fabric with a 50s style swing dress in mind, and I did have a couple of patterns in stock but they would all have required quite a bit of fitting work, and I know that Sew Over It patterns suit my sizing…so on a whim I bought the PDF Betty pattern. Mostly it went together smoothly, although I did not have enough fabric for the skirt pieces so did some re-drafting based on a GBSB circle skirt I made a while back – it worked just fine and the skirt is plenty big – I took a huge amount out of the Betty pattern pieces so goodness knows how big THAT skirt would have been! I do have some minor fit issues to fix for the next make of this pattern – the back gapes a bit on me, partly due to the straps being too loose and sit too wide on my shoulders. Given I finished this the night before the wedding I planned to wear it to, I hacked a fix by pleating the neckline and stitching a fold in the straps at the seams – I wore a cardi over it so it didn’t matter, but I’ll have to fix it better in the long run. Otherwise the fit was good (worn here with a petticoat!).

Betty dress

Secondly, I finished my Spring shrug that was my first proper knitting project and has been WIP since March last year. Currently wrapping up a few other WIPs and then will start the next knit, which will be a Victory Sweater from the V&A archives.

spring shrug

Thirdly, I knocked out another Toaster Sweater in a few hours this Sunday, from the second fabric I had bought from Minerva for the purpose. I realised this would be my first actual attempt at pattern matching, as somehow everything else I’ve made so far has been plain or in a pattern so busy or large that you don’t need to match. Mostly it’s turned out well! I tweaked the neckline for this and it sits much better than the first one – although that may be in part due to the fabric taking a press somewhat better. I also added to the length because I find the first one rides up a little.

Toaster sweater 2

Finally, in other exciting sewing news, I got my first Sew Hayley Jane box this month (medium) and loved it, so excited already for the next one. The black viscose fabric I think I have earmarked for a pair of Sew Over It Ultimate trousers, a pattern I’ve been meaning to revisit since first sewing it at the workshop. The fat quarters I think are destined for new needle case/ pincushion and maybe a headscarf too.

Aaand I’ve fired off a few entries for the Make It Today Dressmaker of the Year competition, in the vintage and ready-to-wear categories. I’m really pleased with the things I submitted so fingers crossed!

It’s also Knitting and Stitching Show time again next weekend, I’ve already got a shopping list forming so stand by for the haul post next week…

 

Toaster Sweater 2 – the best thing since sliced bread!

So here goes my first #projectsewmystyle make – the Sew House 7 Toaster Sweater, version 2. I got the PDF patterns for both Toaster sweaters with the #projectsewmystyle discount code, but I preferred the interesting half-high neckline of version 2 to the full on turtleneck of version 1. I got a Minerva Crafts voucher as a Christmas present, so I used that towards an order of overlocker thread and fabric. I’ve used this grey textured-look ponte roma for the first iteration, but I’m planning to make a second in this stripy black and teal ponte as well.

I really liked this pattern – the sizing and fit are pretty spot on first time (I cut a medium and shortened the sleeves by about 2″, no other alterations) and the instructions are easy and clear, whilst giving multiple options depending on your equipment. I think this may be one of the quickest makes I’ve done, although that may be in some part down to my new toy…

Shortly after my last post I found out Lidl were selling Singer overlockers for £129, and after a small amount of research online indicating this was a good deal and the machines were reliable, I went ahead and bought one. It sat in the box until this month, but I wanted to jump right in and use it for this project. I have used one once before, at a Sew Over It workshop, but that was already threaded and I really had no idea about all the different kinds of overlock stitch. I bought the Beginner Serging Craftsy class and watched most of those videos before sitting in front of the machine. That was really helpful in understanding the different stitches and the mechanics of the machine.

I really didn’t find threading my machine any trouble! I don’t know why people seem to get so worked up about it… The only issue I spent (wasted) hours on was tension – my looper threads were sometimes spot on and sometimes pulling to one side or other, and my needle threads were too loose and forming loops. No matter how I changed the tension, it was barely making a difference. I was about to post a question to the Craftsy class but looked for other questions on tension issues first – and there was an answer from Amy pointing out that Singer machines are known for very tight tension discs, and you have to really “floss” the thread down into them. Sure enough, I re-threaded and “flossed” and felt the thread pop down into the discs. I re-set the tensions to the manual recommendations, put through a scrap of my ponte fabric and it was perfect…. I’m sure you can imagine how the air was blue at the wasted sewing time!!

So I went right ahead and overlocked all my raw edges and the main sleeve/side seams on this project. I was so happy with how quickly it went from unconstructed to completely finished, well apart from hemming… and for this I decided I didn’t want to counteract my high-street like overlocking with a decidedly home-sewn zig zag stitch hem. So challenge no.2 of this project was testing whether my machine is good for twin needle stitching, and working out how on earth that actually works… turns out it’s actually pretty straightforward, as long as your machine will sew with a twin needle, and mine does. It has a second spool pin, so I just popped a bobbin of thread on that for the second needle. I ran through a test piece but didn’t have to mess about with tension too much – I suspect I got lucky with a super-forgiving fabric and tension might need a bit more work on both overlocker and twin needle for future projects.

The only niggle I have with this sweater is the neckline, the fabric doesn’t really press and the facing wouldn’t stay put, so I had to pin it along the foldline per the pattern and then run a row of tiny prick stitches, invisible on the outside, to keep the facing in place (remembering to stretch out the fabric so the stitches are loose enough to allow the neckline to stretch!) The neckline still feels pretty high at the front, so I might try and alter the pattern for the next one to give it a little more scoop.

Here’s some pictures of the finished garment:

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twin needle topstitching

Birmingham Rag Market – Fabric Haul

If you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time I’m sure you’ve gathered by now that I love a fabric bargain! Sure, I’ll invest when it merits it but I also believe there’s a lot of great fabric out there that doesn’t cost the earth.

However, despite the fact my family hails from Birmingham and I find myself there several times a year, I’d never before made it to the Rag Market. Although the site has a history of markets dating back to the 1800s, the rag or retail market itself is of fairly recent pedigree, and the current market site opened in 2000 as part of the redevelopment of the Bullring shopping sites.

The market today has indoor and outdoor stalls, which span the range from fabric and haberdashery, to clothing, beauty products, household as well as fresh veg and flowers. My focus was clearly on the fabrics and notions. There are several stalls with richly decorative fabrics suitable for saris and the like, along with highly detailed border notions. A few stalls focused mostly on heavier household fabrics for curtains and upholstery. I also found one knitting stall, but I passed over this as the autumn Knitting & Stitching Show is coming up soon.

Most of my browsing was over about three or four large stalls with a wide range of cottons, viscose, jersey and lace. I didn’t have a specific shopping list but I was interested in finding some cotton jersey and stretch lace to make some wardrobe basics such as knickers and vest tops.

Although the range on offer was great, several of the stalls had the same or similar fabrics. The most notable difference between the stalls was in the stall holders. On a number of them I spent more than a few minutes browsing and handling fabric with no interest from the stall holder, if indeed I could even tell if they were around. For this reason, the stall I ended up buying from was definitely a stand out. The two men running it were engaging and busily serving customers, at the same time chatting with those waiting and keeping track of who wanted what.

This was my haul:

Large blue rose printed cotton – £2/m – 3 metres

As soon as I saw this print it reminded me of the sort of print Collectif or Dolly & Dotty use. I have in mind a 50s style fit-and-flare dress for this.

Blue rose print cotton

Grey/Pink busy rose printed cotton – £2/m – 2 metres

Another vintage repro style print, this one says skirt to me more than dress, because the print is quite busy. Or maybe a structured bodice top…not sure yet!

grey rose print cotton

Black & White musical note printed cotton – £2/m – 2 metres

This one is destined to become a tote bag for my flute/music stand/music pack when I go back to orchestra in September.

musical note cottonBlack cotton jersey 60″ wide – £2.50/m – 2 metres

At 60″ wide I’ve got loads of this fabric, I’ll be using it to make a load of French knickers and maybe one or two vest tops.

black cotton jersey

Black stretch lace 60″ wide – £2.50/m – 1 metre

Just 1 metre of this 60″ wide stretch lace as I’ll be using it as decorative trim or panels with the above.

black stretch lace

All in all I’d thoroughly recommend the Rag Market, I’ll certainly make it a regular pilgrimage. Now that I have an idea what there is I might go with more of a shopping list next time – for example I didn’t get any trims or notions, although I did see big reels of cotton for only a few pounds. And if you’re after very decorative trims or fabrics for Asian-style clothing, there’s definitely some bargains there.

The easiest way to get to the market is from the main Bullring plaza, follow the street behind the bull statue (which divides the two halves of the shopping centre, lots of restaurants on it) towards St Martin’s church spire which you’ll see sticking up. Then head down the steps to the right hand side and you’ll see the market straight ahead.

GBSB Swing / Circle Skirt

You know the advice that you should never buy fabric without a project in mind? I totally ignore that most of the time. There have been a few exceptions such as the navy twill for the jacket I had to make, but mostly I buy fabric because I like it. Sure, I consider the material type, the weight, the drape and what styles the print would suit, but I don’t always have a project in mind and sometimes end up using that fabric for something totally other than what I originally thought.

This fabric however, I have known exactly what do with since I bought it at March’s Spring Knitting & Stitching Show. The soft drape of the cotton, the brightly colored crazy travel novelty print….it screamed circle/swing skirt!

travel fabric

I used a pattern from my original Great British Sewing Bee book, which meant I had to download, print and piece together the pattern. Considering the way GBSB has inspired so many to take up or resume sewing, I find it disappointing that their books are so opaque on sizing. Each pattern is multi size, usually UK 8-16, but there are no guidelines on waist/bust/hip measurements for each as you would get on a paper pattern. Instead you get a diagram of the pattern pieces printed on one page of the book on a squared background, and the information that each square is 1cm. But again, no clear guidance on how to measure and judge sizing or adjustments from this.

GBSB circle skirt book

The pattern for this skirt is very simple (waistband and 2x skirt panels) and the only important measurement is really the waist. Based on the number of 1cm squares I judged that the largest size 16 was, including seam allowance and the buttonhole overlap feature, approximately 2.5 cm short of my waist measurement. This was easily added to the end of the waistband piece (/2 since it’s cut on the fold), and for the skirt it was added to the straight edge, /4 since there are two skirt pieces (front and back) cut on the fold.

GBSB circle skirt pattern adjustmentI actually cut the bottom of the skirt panel along the size 8 (shortest) line, even though I was also cutting along the size 16 (deepest) waistline. Given my short proportions though this put the finished skirt length just on the knee which is quite flattering.

Cutting was very quick, thanks in part to my new rotary cutter…more about that in another post! It definitely made cutting the long curve of the skirt less of a headache.

Sewing was also quick; sew the front and back skirts at the side seams, insert concealed side zip (I had one the right length and color!), sew waistband in half at the ends, turn and press, sew waistband to skirt, make buttonholes, hem and done!

Finishing the waistband seam was a pain. I think either the instructions are not clear enough or you need a bigger seam allowance. I sewed both raw edges of the waistband to the skirt, then I was trying to turn the raw edges under and top stitch – I had to do this on the inside rather than the outside so I had half a chance of keeping the raw edge under, there wasn’t enough spare.

What I think is supposed to happen is that you sew the front edge of the waistband to the skirt, then turn the back edge under and top stitch to enclose all seams. But the instructions didn’t describe this explicitly and I would have expected them to. Also because you have already stitched both waistband ends together, this makes lining up and accessing the front raw edge a bit tricky at the ends. The alternative is to do what I did but on a 2cm rather than 1.5 seam allowance, so that you have enough to turn under. This would make the waistband narrower but it’s quite generous as is.

Anyway, on to the most exciting bit of sewing this skirt – the buttonholes! The waistband design has an overlap of fabric across the top of the zip which fastens with two buttons. My sewing machine has an automatic buttonhole setting (in fact three styles) and came with the necessary foot. Essentially it works by you setting the button you will use into a gauge in the back of the foot. The needle is threaded in the front of the foot as normal, and you pull a stopper down from a fixed point on the machine to the left of the foot. Then you start the machine sewing (using the start/stop button rather than the foot pedal) and it sews a straight line until the stopper hits the stopper at the front of the button gauge. Then the machine sews a zig zag end, a quick line back to front until it hits the front stopper, then another line backwards to the gauge stopper, locking stitch and stops. Magic! You then use a seam ripper or snips to carefully open the buttonhole between the two lines of stitching.

buttonhole foot I did a lot of practice ones on some scrap fabric (probably more than I needed but it was fascinating me!) and then bit the bullet on the real thing. I think there must be a trick to lining up the holes perfectly parallel, I marked the start of mine but it was hard to see precisely past the machine foot so they are slightly off.

GBSB skirt buttons

Start to finish this is probably the quickest sew, considering I had to print and make up the pattern first too, everything done in less than a day.

GBSB skirt

 

Community Clothing Slim cut Selvedge jeans

By the time this post goes live I will have had my Community Clothing jeans for around a month. That’s not that long considering they were almost six months in the making between when I backed the project and when I got the jeans!

Community Clothing launched on Kickstarter on February 15th and I’m proud to have been among the first backers, making my pledge on the 18th – although I didn’t realise it at the time! A month later it successfully kicked off having raised over the £75,000 target – notably with the support of just over 1,000 backers. That’s really not that many people when you consider the media coverage and clout of the project.

community clarion

The project is the brainchild of Patrick Grant, of Savile Row & GBSB fame. This is what the project is all about, taken from their website:

Community Clothing is a manufacturers cooperative with a simple mission; to make excellent quality affordable clothes for men and women, to create great jobs for skilled workers and by doing this help to restore real pride in Britain’s textile communities.

We are in the business of ‘making clothes, creating jobs and restoring pride’.

The idea is that the Community Clothing range will be manufactured during the “off-season” periods when the factories are not fulfilling orders from the big fashion labels. Plus, by selling direct to the consumer and cutting out the wholesale and retailer markups, the range can be sold at a much lower price than you’d expect for the quality of manufacture and materials used.

For my pledge of £49, I received the women’s slim cut selvedge five-pocket jean. Based on their measurement chart I went for the size 14. There was only one leg length – fair enough for the Kickstarter capsule collection – so I knew they’d be too long. Fortunately the models in the pictures were shown with a turned-up cuff so I thought I would probably do the same.  Sure enough, it’s a double turnup, and I actually think these jeans have come up a little on the larger size. In hindsight I maybe could have gone for the 12 but I absolutely didn’t want them to be too small. They’re definitely less “slim-cut” on me but hey, mom jeans are in fashion now right??

modelling CC jeans

I do love the details of these jeans though. The denim is a really good dark, rich blue and they’re a good weight – you know they’ll last. The outside seam finish is even bound – nice that it’s revealed by the turnup, and all the stitching stands out but also sits well with the dark denim.

CC turnups

CC jeans stitching

The insides count too though, and one of the things I loved about the project was the revival of the “CC” utility clothing wartime logo:

CC41 logo

community clothing logo

 

 

 

 

 

The labelling inside the jeans is simple but effective, and I love that they also put the place of manufacture in such a prominent position.

CC jeans label

Obviously the project has been busy fulfilling all the Kickstarter orders but now they are turning their attention to the next steps, which look to involve an online store, possibly via eBay, launching in early September, and a bricks-and-mortar (literally, restored Victorian) shop-cum-HQ in Blackburn. Due to absurd demand they are taking pre-orders on the current line of products and I can’t wait to see what they come up with next.

Sew Over It 1940s tea dress 

I’m going to come right out and say it – this is by far and away the homesewn garment I am most pleased with so far in my sewing adventures!

I fell in love with the Sew Over It 1940s tea dress pattern well before I felt capable of making it. I bought the pattern while at the Islington store for the Ultimate Trousers workshop back in November 2015 and even though I still loved the design I was more than a little daunted by the 11 pattern pieces actually resulting in 20 elements once cut!Sew Over It 1940s tea dress

Anyway, I already had a fabric in mind that I’d got at the Knitting & Stitching Show March 2015, and a goal – Twinwood Festival, August bank holiday. In the event, I’ve used a different fabric (bought at this year’s K&S Show) and hit an event a month ahead of my deadline! What on earth is going on…?

I actually started on this pattern back in May, and got as far as pattern tracing, cutting out and marking. I cut a size 16 (again) with no adjustments (again) based on a quick toile of the bust section (again!). But then everything got packed away for moving house, then June shot past what with sorting out the new place and a holiday and various upheavals at work, before I could get the sewing stuff out again.

But finally one weekend early in July I decided to tackle it. The fabric is a lovely bright floral print, perfect for summer, in a light and floaty viscose. Lots of drape and lovely to sew! Once I’d sorted out my 20 (!!) pieces again, I got down to sewing. I really liked that the pattern puts the trickiest part first – the bust panels! This looks really complicated but actually it’s not and results in a really professional-looking design which is also very flattering provided it’s fitted correctly. The trick is really taking your time over adjusting the gathers where the bust joins the waist panel.

1940s tea dress bust

The rest of the construction is effectively joining panels; five in total for the skirt (front, side fronts, backs), side backs and backs in addition to the bust and waist panels, then join the top to the bottom. The sleeves are a nice 3/4 length and faced, with a turnup which is a nice detail.

1940s tea dress side view

I managed pretty well matching my seams. Pattern matching is fortunately not really an issue for this print, but the effect of the vertical seams running down the bodice, back and skirt panels is important. I still didn’t manage to get the waist seams to line up across the zip at the back, and I’ve no idea how because that zip was dead straight I swear!1940s tea dress back

There was a fair amount of hand-finishing on this dress too; the three decorative self-cover buttons on the bust, catch-stitching the sleeve turnups and the facing inside, the zip seam allowance at top and bottom, plus I also put in some small stitches to hold the neck facing in place at the shoulders as despite understitching, the lightness of the fabric meant it just wasn’t going to stay turned under.

1940s tea dress buttons

This dress was undoubtedly a lot of work, I estimate 8-10 hours of sewing and hand finishing, including all the pressing and seam finishing, but I think it was well worth it.modelling 1940s tea dress

I think it’s testament to how chuffed I was that I wore it to a very posh city wedding at The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, along with a fetching hat from Bellapacella of Spitalfields Market.

I also reviewed this pattern on The Fold Line: CertainStyle reviews 1940s tea dress on the Fold Line

New Look K6176 shift dress

I think this was my quickest sew from start to finish. I headed off to Paris for a work-related conference in May and although I’d had this pattern in mind and a couple of fabrics lined up for some time, the decision to make this dress and try to finish it in time to take to the conference was pretty last minute!

I was attracted to this pattern over the other shift / pencil dress styles I have (most of my patterns are the result of my monthly Sew magazine subscription, this being no exception) because it had relatively few pieces. I’ve been amazed how complicated some designers can manage to make what is essentially a very simply-shaped garment.

New Look K6176

New Look K6176 has several variations with sleeves, banded hems and pockets, but I went for the simplest sleeveless, single fabric, no pockets design (view D). With the bare minimum of elements (front, back x 2, neck and sleeve bands) and a kind fabric it was pretty quick to cut out. My fabric was one I picked up at the Knitting & Stitching Show in March 2015 – yes, really! A polyester sort of fabric with a slight crepe/textured feel. Identifying and describing fabric is really something I need to learn more about! It’s purple and black with an all over abstract floral motif.

No lining, facing or interfacing meant I could get stuck right in to sewing. It’s basically sew front and back together, and finish the neck and arms with bands. I was glad I’d already made the Agnes top because now I knew what I was making with a neck band – the instructions in the Simplicity pattern were much more confusing so I think this would have stalled me.

K6176 neck back & armhole

The only slight hiccup was that I discovered I didn’t have a black zip. This keeps happening, I’m sure I’ve got some stock notions and then when it comes to it they are nowhere to be found. I made do with a dark brown one, and did a concealed zip rather that the normal one the pattern uses, so you can’t really tell.

K6176 back dress

Fit wise, I was pretty pleased with the length and overall fit given I didn’t do any pattern adjustments. The only niggle is the upper back / neck which is a little too big. It doesn’t quite gape but it’s not far off. I’ll have to try and adjust the pattern for the next iteration but that probably also means calculating a reduction in the length of the neck band…maths isn’t my strong suit so I’ll have to see if Simon can work out the formula!

K6176 back neck

I might have been hand finishing at gone 11pm the night before flying to Paris, but I think it shows how far I’ve come in my sewing adventure that I would a) be able to achieve that and possibly more importantly be happy to wear a me-made garment at a conference representing my company to prospective and existing clients.

K6176 front dress

New Look K6035 navy jacket

To think that I made this back in March/ April, that just seems ages away!

This is also probably the first time I found myself making something I needed more than I wanted. I can think of a ton of much more fun things to wear, but the orchestra I was playing in at the time (not now that we moved, more on that later…) had a summer concert uniform including a navy blazer.

For the first concert I was caught out and had to borrow one, but there was a nice long gap to the next concert and I was determined to be prepared. Given I had not managed to find a navy blazer I liked at a reasonable price point from the high street stores (or indeed barely any at any price point, thanks to whimsies of the “current fashion”) and anyway, I’m supposed to be making not buying, I decided to take the plunge on the most tailored item I’ve made yet.

It’s not as if I could hide the tailoring either – if it was bad it was going to look really bad. Fortunately I had a pattern already from one of my magazine subscriptions; New Look K6035.

New Look K6035 pattern

I read through the instructions and decided I could manage it, so next challenge was finding a suitable fabric. A&M Textiles in High Wycombe came up with the goods, a nicely toned navy twill which was structured enough for the garment (with interfacing) but not too heavy bearing in mind I would be wearing this at a fair number of (hopefully sunny) outdoor concerts.

I interfaced all the necessary pieces right at the start so that I didn’t need to interrupt the sewing process. I opted for a lightweight interfacing, which worked well but in hindsight I think it could have taken a heavier weight and resulted in a slightly stiffer structure, especially in the larger areas such as the front facings.

K6035 front princess seam

Construction wise, I was pretty pleased with the princess seamed front panels which were one of the first elements to sew. I managed to get a really neat smooth curve especially with pressing over a ham. The collar was the big and messy bit, all about matching the notches and sewing to very specific points. The instructions also only mention matching dots, when in fact you also need to line up dot, notch, dot – the whole thing would have been much easier if that was more specific!

I found it particularly hard because most of the time I couldn’t see what I was trying to sew, until the later stages when I could partly turn it through and start to see the result. In fact I almost thought I’d gone wrong right at the end, when I couldn’t seem to turn through correctly – until I realized what structure I’d actually made and folded the fabric at the top of the collar. Suddenly everything fell into place!

I did fail to follow one step though – step 12, I stitched the whole edge of the upper collar/facing rather that only between the dots as instructed. This didn’t actually seem to have any negative effect though, and rather seemed to avoid some later hand-stitching of the neck seam under the facing (step 14), which struck me as a bit awkward. Maybe with a heavier fabric it would be necessary to follow the instructions due to the bulk, but in this case it was fine.

I still managed to fudge one lapel notch though, as evidenced by the photo below. But a bit of unpicking and careful 2nd attempt gave a much neater result.

fudged lapelFit wise, I cut a 16 and made only one alteration based on a rough (sleeveless) toile, which was to make a triangular dart-like adjustment of the side seam, taking in at the widest part at the underarm and grading to meet the seam at the waistline. This was to tailor the sides/back some more, as the two back pieces feature a princess seam and so a standard centre-back adjustment wasn’t possible (or as easy). As it turned out, I should have also done some work on the sleeves, as when I tried the jacket on with sleeves, they were much too big at the armhole. I was loathe to unpick the whole sleeve as I had managed quite a neat set-in, and anyway the shoulder and top of the armhole was ok. Instead I pinned out some excess fabric along the sleeve seamline in a wedge shape, with the widest part at the underarm join. I effectively sewed this as a dart, cut away some excess fabric and re-stitched the sleeve back in. It’s worked but next time I will alter the sleeve pattern piece to match. I think I could still have taken a little more from the side seams as well.

K6035 back jacket

new look K6035 jacket

If I were to make this jacket again, these would be my alterations:

– use a slightly heavier weight fabric and/or interfacing; I think this jacket works better with more structure

– recut pattern to improve fit of sleeve and side jacket seams. I was ok with this fit as the purpose of the garment meant I would be wearing it seated with arms raised (for playing the flute) most of the time and therefore a slightly more relaxed fit is ok

– add a button to the front. For the reasons above I left it open but again I think the style suits a button fastening. I may yet change the jacket to add this

– catch stitch the front facings in place. Again I may go back and fix this as I find it annoying that the front facings tend to “catch the wind” as I’m walking along. They are stitched in place at top and bottom so they can’t completely fold out, but the long edge is open and this is what causes the problem.